Hello there, In today’s blog we’re going to discuss some of the Common WordPress errors and their Solutions.

Creating a Blog or website is now much easier with WordPress. But also sometimes there are various things that come in line while creating a WordPress website.

There are various Common WordPress errors that can solve via very easy methods. But many people don’t know about this.

That’s why we have created this blog regarding Common WordPress errors and their appropriate solutions that you can try.

Let’s get into it and know more about the top t common WordPress errors, and what we can do to solve these problems.

Common WordPress errors

7 Common WordPress errors

There are various errors comes in WordPress but we’re going to know about the most common WordPress errors and they are:

  • 500 Internal Server Error
  • 404 Error
  • Error Establishing a Database Connection
  • White Screen of Death
  • Maintenance Mode Error
  • Memory exhausted Error
  • Syntax error

To troubleshoot these errors, you can try deactivating plugins and switching to the default theme to see if the issue is resolved.

You can also try increasing the memory limit for your website or checking your website’s error logs for more information. If the issue persists, you may need to seek assistance from a developer or your hosting provider.

Apart from this lets us know in detail about these common WordPress errors and how can we solve these errors.

1. 500 Internal Server Error

The 500 Internal Server Error is the most common WordPress error. This error occurs when there is a problem with the server that is hosting your WordPress site.

It can be caused by a variety of issues, such as a plugin or theme conflict, or a problem with your .htaccess file.

Here are some steps you can try to fix a 500 Internal Server Error in WordPress:

1. Check your .htaccess file: This file controls many aspects of your website, including redirects and permalinks. A syntax error in the .htaccess file can cause a 500 Internal Server Error.

To check for errors, you can try renaming the .htaccess file to something like .htaccess_old and then refreshing your website. If the error disappears, you can then edit the .htaccess file to remove the problem line of code.

2. Deactivate all plugins: Plugins can sometimes cause conflicts that result in a 500 Internal Server Error. To troubleshoot this issue, try deactivating all of your plugins.

To do this, log in to your WordPress admin dashboard and go to the Plugins page. Select all of the plugins, and then choose “Deactivate” from the Bulk Actions dropdown menu. If deactivating the plugins resolves the issue, you can then reactivate them one by one to determine which plugin is causing the problem.

3. Switch to the default theme: If a theme conflict is causing the 500 Internal Server Error, switching to the default theme may fix the issue.

To do this, log in to your WordPress admin dashboard and go to the Appearance page. From the Themes page, click the “Activate” button next to the default theme.

4. Increase the memory limit: If your website is using a large amount of memory, it may cause a 500 Internal Server Error. To increase the memory limit, you can add the following code to your wp-config.php file:

define('WP_MEMORY_LIMIT', '256M');

5. Check the error logs: Your hosting provider may have error logs that can provide more information about the cause of the 500 Internal Server Error. You can ask your hosting provider for access to these logs or check the logs yourself if you have access to them.


2. 404 Error

In WordPress, a 404 error is the most common WordPress error and it can occur when a user tries to access a page or post that does not exist, or when the URL for a page or post has been changed.

There are several possible causes for a 404 error in WordPress, including A typo or error in the URL A deleted page or post A broken link on the site A changed permalink structure An issue with the server or hosting environment.

To fix a 404 error in WordPress, you can try the following steps:

  1. Check if the webpage or resource has been deleted or moved to a different location. If it has, try to find the new location or contact the site owner for more information.
  2. Check the URL to make sure it is correct and there are no typos or errors.
  3. If the URL is correct and the webpage or resource has not been moved, try refreshing the page or clearing your browser cache and cookies.
  4. If the issue persists, it may be necessary to contact the site owner or a WordPress developer for further assistance.
  5. Check for any broken links on the site that may be causing the 404 error. You can use a plugin like Broken Link Checker to help identify and fix any broken links.
  6. If the 404 error is occurring on a specific post or page, try resetting the permalinks by going to Settings > Permalinks in the WordPress dashboard and clicking the “Save Changes” button.
  7. Use a plugin like Redirection to set up a redirect from the old URL to the new one, if the webpage or resource has been moved to a new location.

3. Error Establishing a Database Connection

It is an error message that can occur when WordPress, a popular content management system (CMS) software, is unable to connect to the MySQL database that it uses to store and retrieve data. This error can be caused by a variety of issues, like Incorrect database login credentials.

To fix the “Error establishing a database connection” error in WordPress, you can try the following steps:

  1. Check the WordPress configuration file (wp-config.php) to ensure that the database login credentials are correct. These include the database name, username, password, and hostname. If any of these are incorrect, you will need to update them to the correct values.
  2. Check with your hosting provider to ensure that the MySQL database is available and has not been deleted or otherwise made unavailable.
  3. If none of the above steps resolve the issue, it may be necessary to contact your hosting provider or a WordPress developer for further assistance.
  4. Check the MySQL server to make sure it is running and responsive. You can do this by accessing the MySQL command line or by contacting your hosting provider.
  5. If you are using a shared hosting provider, try increasing the PHP memory limit by adding the following line to your wp-config.php file:
define('WP_MEMORY_LIMIT', '256M');

4. White Screen of Death

WSoD or “white screen of death” is used to describe a blank, white screen that appears when a WordPress site is experiencing a fatal error.

This error can be caused by a variety of issues like A plugin or theme that is causing a conflict or error, an Exhausted PHP memory limit, A problem with the WordPress database, or A server error or issue with the hosting services.

To fix the white screen of death (WSoD) in WordPress, you can try the following steps:

  1. The first step is to deactivate all plugins by going to the WordPress dashboard and selecting Plugins > Installed Plugins. Select all plugins and choose “Deactivate” from the Bulk Actions dropdown menu. If this resolves the issue, you can try reactivating the plugins one by one to determine which plugin is causing the problem and after that deactivate it.
  2. Check the WordPress database for any errors or corruption. You can use a plugin like WP Database Manager to optimize and repair the database.
  3. You Increase the PHP memory limit by adding the following line to your wp-config.php file:
define('WP_MEMORY_LIMIT', '256M');

5. Maintenance Mode Error

The “maintenance mode error” in WordPress occurs when the site is in the process of being updated or maintained and is temporarily unavailable to users.

It is also considered a common WordPress error, This error is typically displayed when WordPress is running an update, installing a plugin or theme, or performing other maintenance tasks.

To fix the maintenance mode error in WordPress, you can try the following steps:

  1. Refresh the website or Hard refresh In mac: Hold down Command, Shift and click the ‘R’ key, and on Windows Hold down Ctrl, Shift, and the ‘R’ key
  2. If the maintenance mode error persists, you can try accessing the site via FTP and deleting the .maintenance file from the site’s root directory. This will disable maintenance mode and allow you to access the site again.
  3. Wait a few minutes and try accessing the site again. The maintenance mode error should resolve itself once the update or maintenance task has been completed.
  4. If you still face this issue you can contact your hosting provider to solve this problem for you.

6. Memory Exhausted Error

The “memory exhausted error” in WordPress, usually means that your website is using more memory than your hosting server is allowing.

This can be caused by a number of things, like A plugin or theme that is using too much memory, a poorly optimized database that is using too much memory, and a large number of visitor traffic on your website.

To fix this memory exhaustion error issue, you can try the following steps:

1. Increase Memory Limit: First thing you can do is to Increase the memory limit in WordPress: You can try increasing the memory limit in WordPress by adding the following code to your wp-config.php file:

define('WP_MEMORY_LIMIT', '256M');

2. Optimize your database: If your database is large and poorly optimized, it could be using too much memory. You can try optimizing your database using a plugin like WP-Optimize or by using a tool like PHPMyAdmin.

3. Deactivate plugins: If you suspect that a plugin is causing the memory exhaustion error, you can try deactivating all of your plugins and then reactivating them one by one to determine which plugin is causing the problem.

4. Upgrade Your Hosting Plan: You can contact to your hosting provider and tell them to upgrade your hosting plans.

You can know about how to fix memory exhaustion error here:


7. Syntax error

The Syntax error is a common WordPress error in WordPress is occurs due to a problem with the code in a WordPress plugin or theme.

This error can occur when the code is written incorrectly or is not in the correct format, causing the site to display an error message or function improperly.

To fix this Syntax error issue, you can try the following steps:

  1. The first thing you do is by activating any conflicting plugins or themes that may be causing the error.
  2. Check the WordPress error logs for any clues about the cause of the syntax error. You can access the error logs through the WordPress dashboard or via FTP.
  3. Check the WordPress configuration file (wp-config.php) to ensure that the database login credentials are correct.
  4. If the issue persists, it may be necessary to contact a WordPress developer or your plugin/theme provider for further assistance.

8. Sorry, This File Type is not Permitted for Security Reasons

This message is often displayed to protect the security of a system or network by preventing the use of certain types of files that may contain malicious code or other security risks.

There are a few common reasons why a file type may be prohibited:

  • The file type is known to be used to spread malware or other malicious software.

To fix this error issue, you can try the following steps:

In order to resolve this issue, you may need to convert the file to a different format than is allowed. Alternatively, you may need to contact the recipient or the website administrator to request permission to send the file in its current format. It’s always a good idea to be cautious when working with unfamiliar file types and to verify the security of any files you receive before opening them.

Check the file size: Some systems have a maximum file size limit for uploaded or downloaded files. If your file is too large, it may not be allowed. For More Read Here


9. 403 forbidden error

A 403 Forbidden error is an HTTP status code that indicates that the client does not have permission to access the requested resource. This can occur for a variety of reasons, such as when the server is configured to block access to certain types of content, or when the server has determined that the client does not have the necessary permissions to access the resource.

To fix this 403 forbidden error issue, you can try the following steps:

  • Check the URL for any errors or typos and try accessing the resource again.
  • Clear your browser’s cache and cookies and try accessing the resource again.
  • If you are attempting to access the resource through a web application, check the application’s configuration to ensure that the request is not being blocked.
  • Check the permissions on the resource to ensure that you have the necessary access to view it.
  • It is recommended that you check the website or server’s documentation or contact the website or server administrator for further assistance.

FAQ

Can we Fix WordPress Errors?

Yes, you can fix common WordPress errors.

WordPress error HTTP 500

This error is mostly caused due to plugin/theme issues, corruption .htaccess file, database, caching issues, hosting issues, or due to a PHP memory limit.

Conclusion

I hope this article helps you to know about the Common WordPress errors and how you can fix them. We will also suggest you to create a backup of your WordPress site before attempting to fix this error, in case any changes you make to the site result in data loss or other issues.

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If you have any questions or suggestions you can write down belwo on the comment section we will try to help you with your problems. Thanks for reading this blog. Do you also have any other common WordPress errors in mind do share with us.

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